It’s the middle of summer and it seems that Reel Big Fish has come out with the perfect album for the season. Candy Coated Fury, RBF’s latest edition to their discography of fun-loving, sarcastic hits, is packed full of all the things that make us love them.  From their killer horn licks, snarky break-up songs, and sharply candid lyricism right down to their easily skank-able beats, Reel Big Fish has done it again.

The album opens up with a classically in your face tune “Everyone Else is an Asshole,” full of shout choruses and frank lyrics that brought an instant grin to my face because of the incredible relatability of the childish lyrics, all of which have crossed our minds when we’ve just had enough of everybody’s idiocy. RBF’s lyrics have this incredible timelessness to them, full of enough comedic relief and adolescent angst  and served with a robust, point-blank attitude that both kids and grandmas can relate to. (Now, that’s not to guarantee you’ll catch Gramps at the next Reel Big Fish concert bustin’ a hip to “She Has a Girlfriend Now”

The album is busting at the liner note staples with get-back-on-your-feet, empowering break-up songs like “She’s Not the End of the World” and “P.S. I Hate You,” and will most definitely be hailed as a fantastic after-break up anthem album for future generations. (No more Every Rose Has Its Thorn, boys!) Candy Coated Fury is one of those albums you’ll pop in while breezing down the highway on a summer drive while getting over your latest psycho girlfriend… erm… heartache.

Per usual Reel Big Fish fashion, Candy Coated Fury features covers of some 1980’s new wave-pop ditties. They thickened up “Don’t Let Me Down Gently” from the Wonderstuffs, a cute little tune that was in need of a bit more funk and horns, as well as When In Rome’s new wave love song “The Promise,” both of which are far more enjoyable the second time around.

Reel Big Fish’s success is mostly due to their ability to take commonalities and express them through uncommon means. They’ve concocted a wondrous recipe for perfection- equal parts rumpshakin’ ska and teenage punk rage wrapped in bluntly raunchy lyrics left to bake in Southern California heat. Sprinkle it with enough mainstream to gain you some airtime without spoiling whole batch. This being said, go out and don’t stop skanking!

 – Liz Russell